What the Archives of Actual Classrooms Tell about the History of Teaching | A Conversation with Rachel Buurma and Laura Heffernan

In The Teaching Archive: A New History for Literary Study Dr. Rachel Sagner Buurma and Dr. Laura Heffernan turn to archives from the actual classrooms of major literary critics of the past century to see what the available course documents tell about the history of the teaching of literature. This approach contrasts with existing histories, such as Gerald Graff’s Professing Literature, which are based on archives of published works about teaching rather than archives of teaching itself. While this book will naturally interest literature teachers most, I think that Buurma and Heffernan’s methods and findings have wider implications across academia. Every discipline has a pedagogical past to learn from and a future to archive for.

Read Article →

Latest and Greatest Books on College Teaching

Linda B. Nilson presents six recently published books (2010-2014) that capture what she considers the latest and most important developments and trends in college teaching and learning, relating to technology, the science of learning, and the lives of today’s college students.

Read Article →

Infographic: Grow the 8%

“It has been well documented that colleges and universities are substantially failing to effectively educate students.” Meanwhile, research and theory on what actually works “flourish in the scholarship on teaching and learning. . .” (The Manifesto). College teachers can make a difference when they engage with this scholarship. Unfortunately, too few do. To encourage changing that, we present our infographic: “Grow the 8%.” 

Read Article →